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Felisha Monet is a name synonymous with girl power in Miami, Florida.

Respected radio personality Monet is popularly known for her spot on Miami’s 99 Jamz station. From 2pm to 7pm daily, Monet uses her platform to not only talk music with some of today’s hottest artists, but to bring awareness to a group she’s most passionate about serving: young women and children, specifically those who’ve survived domestic violence and abuse.

On the air Monet is known for her energetic and warm personality, off the air she’s just the same, spending her time hosting events for non-profits and charities.

We caught up with this power woman with her sights set on not only dominating the radio waves, but changing the way we view women’s empowerment.

How do you feel about radio in this new wave of digital media and communication?
“I understand the industry is forever changing. Music has always been my passion even though I’m not musically inclined, so I chose to do radio to be able to talk with artists and also play good music for my listeners. As far as digital, I don’t plan on making a huge transition to the platform, but I do believe in using it to your advantage.”

In what ways do you use the digital platform to engage your audience?
“I communicate with people across the world through my social media platforms. I’m very active on Twitter and Instagram, so I make good use of that. I’m in the process of developing an app right now and developing a podcast as well. And I post all my upcoming events on my website/blog. But for me it’s still very important to get out of that space and go out into the community. That’s what I love about it; they know my voice from being on air every day, but I also make a point for them to get to know me through the work I do.”

What kind of work in the community do you do?
“I work closely with a woman’s recovery center called the Susan B. Anthony Shelter for women and children. These women and their kids often come from violent and abusive homes. I host women’s empowerment workshops for the ladies. I also help provide a work and career training program, which the women are enrolled in for 18 months and at the end they graduate.”

Why is community so important to you?
“I like to hear the stories of others! They’re incredible tales of survival and it’s such a heartfelt experience. Self-empowerment is so vital to the success of anyone, so if I’m able to help them with their confidence and self esteem after it was broken in those relationships, then I feel good myself. It’s also important for me to share my stories with others; I made a lot of sacrifices in my life to follow my dreams, so I share that with them. I want them to know that they have had a rough life but they can still work on their dreams! It’s never too late to chase your dreams.”

How do you think women in media can be more united?
“I think it’s all about perspective as far as women’s empowerment and unity. Sometimes we shouldn’t think about it so hard. Just show support without having to say, ‘oh look, this is me supporting another woman,’ and just do it. Sometimes we need to just switch our lens and way of thinking and not look at us as being divided and look at us as sisters right off the bat.”