Yesterday [Thursday, May 12], Angie Martinez dropped by The Breakfast Club to discuss her forthcoming book, My Voice: A Memoir.

Angie has survived the transitions of both Hip Hop and the radio business, still reigning on top as one of the most highly successful Hip Hop journalists to date. She’s such a legend JAY Z ensured she heard all of his projects before they released, solely based off the trust of her respected opinion. She witnessed and experienced the infamous East Coast vs. West Coast beef and recalls the hostility that was present and how real danger was the true essence of that controversy.

Angie was very transparent in her Breakfast Club interview, and even more so in her book where she shares some brutally honest truths about her life that her listeners may have never imagined.

Angie’s Hip Hop tell all is fully factual but we couldn’t help but read between the lines and get some key takeaways for ourselves. Here is what we learned from Angie Martinez and why we can’t wait to read the book in its entirety.

  • Commitment is still the most important ingredient in success.

DJ Envy brought up the fact of how interesting it is that Angie knows how to do everything and still chooses to do everything during a time that there are other workers and an array of software that can complete those tasks for her. Angie’s response was:

“I can’t tolerate being somebody that’s not good. I can’t tolerate people who are lazy or people who aren’t committed. I’m committed to what I do so if you are a part of my team I need you to also be committed to whatever your piece of that is.”

Despite the changes and transitions of the radio and digital media industry, work ethic and drive are and will always be determining factors that distinguishes mediocre talent from superb talent which speaks for itself when it comes to the longevity of Angie Martinez’s career.

  • Be true to you.

In the book Angie finally goes in detail about a two hour long interview she had with Tupac at the peak of the East Coast vs. West Coast dispute. Of that two hours she only aired 12 minutes. If it was another journalist, more than likely that entire two hours would have been aired despite the uncensored animosity that could’ve made things worse than they were.

In hindsight, Angie takes pride in her decision in regard to the Tupac interview. She takes pride in knowing her style of journalism and how her unique approach to her work has helped her succeed thus far. Your style is your truth and your truth is unique in itself. Own it in its entirety.

  • Satisfaction is Complacency.

Charlamagne assured Angie that her and her peers were indeed legends. Angie humbly denied in the sense of wanting more. She stated, “I still don’t feel like I’ve made it. I still feel like I want to do films. I want to write a movie script. I want to do TV.”

It just goes to show that the most highly successful people are never satisfied and always looking towards the next goal and the next accomplishment. Stay hungry no matter what heights you’ve reached.

My Voice: A Memoir by Angie Martinez will be out in stores on May 17 and can be pre-ordered on Amazon now.