Last night [July 26] on Night 2 of the Democratic National Convention, American history was made.

Hillary Rodham Clinton became the first woman to earn the nomination for presidency from a major US party. While Senator Bernie Sanders fought a good fight, he only had 1,893 delegates to Clinton’s 2,814. Needing only 2,383 delegates for the nomination, it was clear who the Democratic party had chosen as their nominee. The state of Vermont decided to go last in the roll call and Sanders graciously moved to give Clinton the party’s nomination by acclamation, a gesture Clinton made in 2008 to President Obama.

The rest of the night was full of joy, jokes and even some tears. Elizabeth Banks started off the night of speeches with an imitation of Donald Trump’s entrance, while it was clearly a joke the crowd seemed a little stiff. She then proceeded into an inspiring tale of her first date with her husband, a rally for Bill Clinton, where she first heard [Hillary] Clinton speak.

The Mothers of the Movement took the stage soon after with the first inspiring words coming from Geneva Reed-Veal, Sandra Bland’s mother. She spoke with such passion, visibly holding back tears as she recounted the events that led to her daughter’s death. Stating that Hillary Clinton knows “that when a young Black life is cut short, it’s not just a loss, it’s a personal loss, a national loss.” Trayvon Martin’s mother, Sybrina Fulton closed out the segment urging the people “to vote this election day.”

Hillary’s husband, Bill Clinton, ended the night with a loving speech that allowed the American people to see not only the woman worthy of becoming our next President, but the woman who stole his heart. Detailing the events of their early relationship, the Former President claims he found Hillary to be magnetic due to her “strength and self possession.” He then went into her contributions to education, healthcare reform and foreign policy.

Although, Hillary was not there physically she was seen via satellite live from New York. The sound of breaking glass following a montage of all the male presidents before her gave a visual of what Hillary has been saying she intends to do, break through the glass ceiling, since her first presidential run in 2008.