It was only a matter of time until 21-year-old Marc Stewy found himself behind the mic.

Growing up in a musical household, where his mother would have the jazz greats and neo-soul legends on repeat, and his father exposed him to artists such as Dead Prez, The Roots, Black Star and Slum Village, Stewy was both destined and encouraged to make his own music. His mother even surprised him with his first MacBook, trusting that he would use it well. With the support of encouraging parents who saw that music was something positive and productive he was gravitating towards, he made the decision to take a break from college and focus on his exploring his talents within music.

From utilizing introductory software such as Garage Band and recording vocals in his closet as a teenager leading him to where he is now, Stewy’s passion organically became an obsession, and now at the early stages in his career as an emcee, he’s showing a lot of promise he’s in it for the long haul.

While his latest project, Turn On The Lights EP, is another chapter bringing the emcee closer to figuring out who he is and what he wants to achieve within his music, the rapper’s fighting spirit is something that shines through in his music and visuals alike.

In a new music video for his Ian J-produced track “Decisions,” the young rapper takes it to the Everglades in a Florida-themed anthem that shows Stewy is as unapologetic in his lyrical content as he is confident in his delivery. The mixture is proving to be equal parts potent and refreshing. 

The Source: How long have you been doing what you do? How did you get started?
Malc Stewy: I wrote my first rap for this girl I was trying to get when I was 15. I didn’t take myself seriously until I was 17 though. I just turned 21 a week or two ago.
Is there an early memory you’d like to share about getting into your craft, such as when you realized this was more than just a hobby or a passion? 
I realized music was my passion after I bombed my first two semesters in college; told my mom that I was dropping my classes to have more time to be creative, and focus on improving my craft. I would go to class stoned and write raps instead of taking notes, I was there physically but definitely not mentally.
How do you describe your sound? 
First off, anything you hear me on is gonna knock. If you’re at a show, you’re going to feel it in your chest. I’m not the type of guy to say the first thing that comes to mind; the whole creative process is important to me. I really like to let the listener decide though. I’m not the biggest fan of creating expectations.
Who are your influences?
Black Star, Dead Prez, Andre 3000, Cole is dope. I’m a huge TDE fan, musically I think they’re ahead of a lot of MF’s. I also listen to a lot of Jill Scott and Erykah Badu. My mom sings neo soul/jazz, so I grew up with them on repeat.
What is some advice that has stuck with you?
I opened up for Dead Prez on the closing day of Dilla Weekend 2015 in Miami, and towards the end of the event I got to chop it up with their DJ Mic Flow. He told me that the road I’m taking isn’t an easy one, but as long as I keep stomping on “their” necks, “they” will have no choice but to pay attention. No matter what it is I’m doing that conversation always runs through my mind.
What do you hope people take away from listening to your music?
I just want people to enjoy it. I want people to want to show it to their friends, play it at a party, while they work out, etc.