Nas‘ eight-episode Netflix show Rapture showcases the journey of MCs who have successfully flourished past the barriers that came along with their hip-hop coming, including Rapsody, who the class-act lyricist revealed he wanted to sign to his record label, Mass Appeal.

The QB legend has been on a roll with the release of two historically hip-hop infused programs starting with Mass Appeal documentary, Word Is Bond. Directed by Sacha Jenkins, Word Is Bond digs into the history of hip-hop lyricism with insight from the folks behind the lyrics. Next up is an eight-episode show with Netflix, Rapture, where Nas brings you into his world as an icon and tells the story of the diverse come-ups behind hip-hop’s most currently acclaimed acts in the likes of T.I, G-Eazy, A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie, Logic, 2 Chainz, hip-hop veteran Killer Mike, Nas’ protege Dave East, and Roc Nation’s Rapsody.

In a recent interview with Billboard, in lieu of promoting Rapture, Nas spoke on the importance in showcasing the journeys of successful MCs from diverse backgrounds such as Dave East, 2 Chainz, and Rapsody, and went on to explain the reason why he favored the craft of Rapsody, noting the North Carolina MC as “a female hip-hop artist who could spit better than most,” and also pointed out how instrumental her presence is in Rapture.

“I’ve known Rapsody for a while, and we were talking about signing her for a while. Very interested in her whole thing, so it was an honor to have her — a female hip-hop artist who could spit better than most of the hip-hop artists right now,” said Nas. “It was important that we showcase that, especially right now with the season of Netflix and the Roxanne Roxanne movie about a hip-hop pioneer. Someone who comes from my neighborhood Queens, a big inspiration for me.”

Rapsody, who is currently signed with 9th Wonder for Jamla Records and also an artist under Jay-Z‘s Roc Nation, drove a gang of pride into the culture of hip-hop when she was nominated for two Grammys thanks to her second studio album Laila’s Wisdom. Many find the persona and style of the “Sassy” rapper to be nostalgic to a prime Lauryn Hill or MC Lyte, which is no other than classic hip-hop fashion.

Reflecting a style that hones the modern atmosphere and respects the foundation is a trait the North Carolina native does effortlessly. Rapsody’s hip-hop coming sheds the spotlight on female hip-hop pioneers such as Roxanne Shanté, whose highly anticipated Netflix biopic, Roxanne Roxanne premieres Friday, Mar. 23.

When a legend like Nas respects your craft, and honors your effort, you are bound to go down in history as a hip-hop great. “I’ve been a supporter of all rap, male and female, since the beginning. Antoinette, MC Lyte — Rapsody, to me, comes from that lineage, so it’s important right now and we are so timely and so on point with this Rapture piece.”