Yesterday (June 10) we celebrated the 10-year anniversary of arguably Lil Wayne’s greatest LP, Tha Carter III. To top off the celebration, Weezy performed at this year’s HOT 97 Summer Jam, which also doubled as the show’s 25th anniversary.

Peep his the entire set below if you couldn’t make it to MetLife Stadium last night:

After nearly six years of label disputes, Dwayne “Lil Wayne” Carter is free to release the long awaited album, Tha Carter V. The album was announced in 2012, with the intention of fan consumption in 2014.

In 2014, Weezy spoke out against Cash Money CEO Bryan “Birdman/Baby” Williams for the first time.

“I want off this label and nothing to do with these people but unfortunately it ain’t that easy,” he said. “I am a prisoner and so is my creativity.”

Everyone was alarmed by the Young Money President’s tweet, due to his father/son relationship with Williams. Birdman ushered Tunechi into the rap game as a teenager, groomed him, and even gave him the name “Birdman Jr.” Unfortunately, the public statements confirmed the severity of the dispute.

In January 2015, Lil Wayne announced a $51 million lawsuit against Cash Money. Three and 1/2 years later, he wins the suit in a settlement of $8 million.

A lot has change in music since Carter’s last release, Tha Carter IV. Rap has changed sonically. The way we consume music has changed. Hip-Hop is the most dominant genre in music. In more ways then one, Lil Wayne helped to propel the genre to its current status, as one the greatest artists and rappers of all time. Throughout his dispute with Cash Money, he has made some featured appearances, including DJ Khaled’s “I’m the One” in 2017. In addition, he released the Dedication 6 mixtape during the latter part of 2017. If you’ve listened to previous mixtapes from Carter, you already knew what was in store.

Starting from scratch may not seem ideal due to the long wait, but it can serve as a benefit. In his peak, Tunechi flooded the airwaves and iPods. Instead, a Sorry 4 the Wait mixtape could be in the works before the album release, giving us a preview of the evolution and integration within Hip-Hop’s current dominate state in music.

Many have to wonder how Wayne plans to roll out this album, as well as how he’s going to reinvent himself during the process. It has been six long years. Let the legacy commence, again.

 

 

Lead Image: WireImage / Page Six