Certainly making the state of Georgia proud, Migos is set to receive the prestigious ASCAP Vanguard Award for experiencing a fruitful year in the music world.

The American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers made the announcement on Friday (June 15) deeming the trio as “influential,” slating them underneath the “R&B” category. All three members Offset, Takeoff, and Quavo will attend the organization’s 31st annual ASCAP Rhythm & Soul Music Awards where they will collectively accept the honor.

So, who is the ASCAP? They are a non-profit performing rights society that protects the musical rights of artists in their membership, assuring that they are properly compensated through the platforms of that artist’s live performances, broadcasts, or music streams. According to ASCAP, the ASCAP Vanguard Award “recognizes the impact of musical genres that help shape the future of American music.” Blatant members of the organization, the musical triumph of Migos has been recognized by their fellows due to their ability to streamline trap music into the mainstream sector.

“From their peerless triplet-based raps to bringing the dab to pop culture, Migos have been one of the most influential acts in hip-hop,” said ASCAP President Paul Williams.  “After breaking out with “Versace” in 2013, Offset, Quavo and Takeoff proved that they could bring their trap style to the top of the charts. Their inimitable chemistry transcends genre.”

While the ASCAP does not have hip-hop sanctioned as one of their genres, the “Look At My Dab” trio is primarily being recognized under the “pop” music genre. Ever since their 2013 hit single “Versace,” the trap rappers have managed to continuously dominate the charts with trend twisting songs such as 2015’s “Look At My Dab,” which evoked the “dabbing” dance phenomenon. Their next culture shaking hit “Bad and Boujee,” set a persona trend all over the globe minutes after its release, earning the three amigos with their first Grammy nomination. The aforementioned tracks, along with the collective’s most recent “MotorSport” featuring Cardi B and Nicki Minaj, “Stir Fry,” and “Walk It Talk It” featuring fellow hip-hop phenomenon Drake have analytically prevailed in streaming platforms such as Apple Music and Spotify, confirming the predestined accolade. Both of the trio’s last two albums Culture and Culture II have managed to reach No. 1 on the Billboard 200 albums chart and achieve platinum status.

Does Migos’ climb up into the esteemed corners of the music world mean that trap music has a chance at longevity?