Harlem natives Cam’ron, Jim Jones, Juelz Santana and Freeky Zekey got something cinematic about them. They keep you watching… Which is probably why reality television (there would be no Love and Hip-Hop without them) is so attracted to the Harlem crew.

The answer is really simple; When you see them, they drip with all things fly, all things charismatic and all things worthy of Hip-Hop rock stars.

And so while everyone is excited to hear the new music next week (they are set to drop their first full length studio album, Diplomatic Ties,  in 14 years), fans should also get excited about the documentary on the making of the album scheduled to drop at the top of the year.

What’s so special about the Dip doc? First, everyone has equal camera time. This will give the viewers an unprecedented amount of access to the process of creating this new album, the history of the group, Harlem’s gentrification, and a rare look at the personal relationships between all four members- with all four members in face to face dialogue.  The Heatmakers even speak on that extra sauce that makes this crew iconic.

One gem dropped in the flick is that The Dipset were the first crew to drop album-like mixtapes. Let’s back up for the new jacks in the culture. Before 2000, mixtapes were not seen as an artist’s  substitute album or extended play project (most commonly called an EP).  A mixtape was a compilation put together by popping street djs with exclusive songs, remixes or blends. Dipset was hot in this market, appearing on all of the great mixtape djs’ projects (Ron G, DJ Kay Slay, DJ Clue, etc.). Cam deduced that if the group compiled all their music on one mixtape, they could shift the game. And they did. Before 50 Cent killed the mixtape game, these guys figured out the magic in producing, marketing and distributing their own products with a system super similar to street hustling.

THERE YOU HAVE IT: They gave you game from the rip and are back to teach us again how to change the game.

Sorry Migos… If we are comparing rap groups to rock groups, The Wu Tang Clan would be The Beatles, The ASAP Mob would be Aerosmith and Dipset would be The Rolling Stones. Cam and Jim are Mick and Keith. Juelz and Zekey are Charlie and Ronnie. The entire lot of them, like The Stones, create culture around cool.

Fashion. Music. Video. Lifestyle.

The film sucks you in and primes you for the rest of 2019, a year that promises fans more music proving more than ever that Harlem’s favorite sons are one of the most influential acts in Hip-Hop.