Born Kiari Kendrell Cephus, Offset was literally made for entertainment and was apparently destined for some type of victory in it. In a recent story with the New York Times, the crowd-pleasing Migos artist’s mother, Latabia revealed that at one point of her now famed son’s journey, he was a professional back up dancer and even worked for the late Whitney Houston and the CrazySexyCool, TLC.

Centered around the influence of his absentee father, Latabia recalled her stance during Offset’s adolescence which she spent trying to lure her son away from the traps of the streets. As most mothers do, she got her son involved in sports, but it was his deed as a young professional backup dancer at the tender age of 10 years old. Offset was featured in Whitney Houston’s 2002 “Whatchulookinat” music video.

Just last month, he shared a photo on Instagram highlighting the moment, not necessarily slating the backup dancer identity, but hyping up his familiarity with fame.

“I BEEN DOING THIS ENTERTAINMENT GOD MY WITNESS WHICH ONE IS ME????,” says the caption.

Offset overall reminisced about his coming to fame by recollecting his childhood and the challenges that came with it. From his juvenile criminology to premature fatherhood, the Atlanta creative has found refuge in his Hip-Hop ascendancy.

“I’ve just been making them bangers since that,” he said. “Oh my God, it feels so good to be a winner,” said Offset via New York Times.

And through Hip-Hop, he found the love of his life, his superstar wife Cardi B and brought a precious baby girl into the world, Kulture- thanks to the art of modern-day rapping. The “Versace” rapper truly embraced the quality of life thanks to Hip-Hop.

“I have a wife and a child — that changed my whole everything,” he added. “I was a young hothead, but now I understand the value of life.”

Without a doubt, Migos is one of the leading forces of modern-day Hip-Hop music and culture and with Offset’s organic attraction to the mold of an entertainer, it shovels the new school spitter’s ability to promote substantial rap.