The season 8 premiere of Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta came last night (March 25th) on VH1 and it wasn’t short of anything but drama!

The two-hour premiere was packed with all the key cast members and their usual drama-following up from last season’s debacle right where they left off. The Dancehall diva Spice story was front and center on last night’s episode as her story unfolds surrounding her highly publicized skin bleaching stunt that got tongues wagging on social media and every high profile blogs both in the US and Jamaica.

The dancehall star has been advocating against skin bleaching since last year when she released her song “Black Hypocrisy.” Spice was explaining to her fellow cast members of the struggles she endured being a “dark skin” woman [in Jamaica]and as female entertainer being faced with all types of hate and criticism especially from the black community and how colorism continues to have a significant impact in Jamaican society. The “Captured” deejay visited her dermatologist to get a professional outlook on the best ways that she can lighten her skin. The visit quickly went left when Spice blasted the dermatologist who told her she will need a psychological evaluation if she was going to consider bleaching her skin and also to evaluate the severe risks involved in bleaching and the repercussions that come along with cosmetic procedures.

By that time Spice started to get angry at the dermatologist while saying that she feels offended.

The dancehall deejay then took up her bag and stormed out of the doctor’s office while telling her that she will take a picture and send to her when she gets her skin bleaching procedure done. Based on the preview, it appears that the dancehall diva will be bringing a lot more of her “spice” to Love and Hip Hop: Atlanta. Spice was a major hit on the show last year and this year is shaping up to be even bigger.

In another sneak peek from last night’s season 8 premiere, the dancehall diva breaks down the meaning behind some of the famous phrases used in Jamaican culture like “Matey,” “Goodaz,” and “par pon di endz.”

Stevie J surprisingly got the meaning behind “Matey” correct, as he explains, “That’s like the girlfriend the side joint.” For the most part, Stevie J, Kirk Frost, Karlie Redd, Rashida, Mimi Faust and Tokyo Vanity were clueless about what these phrases meant and was funny to watch them trying to decipher what they say. I guess we have to tune in to watch Spice enlighten them more on the Jamaican lingo all season long.