Since it’s inception in 2010, Twitter has been a place for celebrities, politicians, and ordinary people to share their thoughts in the form of short tweets, photos, or videos. Elon Musk, the founder and CEO of Tesla, has long been one of Twitter’s most active celebrity accounts. While Musk has never been one to shy away from the somewhat shocking or borderline controversial, his Twitter took a serious turn for the weird this weekend….and doesn’t seem to be returning to normal anytime soon.

Following weeks of mundane and typical tweets about Tesla, technology, and the usual things that a tech CEO would share, Musk shared some amateur artwork of a character named “2b” from the video popular game “Nier Automata.”  Since it was clear that Musk did not create the art himself, several of his followers asked him to properly credit the artist, who it would later be discovered was a woman named Meli Magali. While most celebrities who have been called out for this minor infraction quickly credit the artist, Musk began replying to commenters with odd statements such as “always credit everyone,” “no one should be credited with anything ever,” and “I wish people would stop crediting artists on twitter when any fool can find out who the artist was in seconds. It’s destroying the medium.”

Although he deleted that Tweet, he posted a series of other bizarre ones on June 15 and 16 including the following: “Truth is a metaphorical concept with no footwear or clothing of anything kind. Also, baby don’t hurt me haha,” which was accompanied by a picture of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

He also posted a series of up-close bee images, one of which was accompanied by “feeling cute today, might pollinate some plants, idk,” and “feeling cute today, may get a tattoo, idk.” On late Sunday night, he cryptically posted “Just deleted my Twitter,” which would obviously be impossible since he posted it from his Twitter account, which has seen no activity as of press time.

The latest Twitter activity has many people concerned about the future of the already shaky company, which has had trouble in recent months as it has tried to move into the consumer-price market with its new model.