Nick Cannon is indeed one of the hardest working media moguls in the entertainment industry to date. He always has something up his sleeve, whether it’s his highly successful MTV2 show Wild N’ Out or calling out rappers to battle for $100K. Nonetheless, it’s been quite a while since we’ve actually heard Cannon lay his vocals on a track, but his frustrations with his ongoing divorce put an end to his music drought.

Earlier this month sources stated Cannon was the particular party that was holding up the status of Nick and Mariah’s divorce. The couple has been separated for nearly two years and the divorce is still not official due to Nick Cannon not signing necessary paperwork.

Cannon had an exclusive conversation with KarenCivil.com as he explained the process of creating his new freestyle, “Divorce Papers.” He stated:

“My purpose for creating this ‘Divorce Papers’ freestyle was not to feed the tabloid chatter, or even to diffuse it. This was strictly a creative way for me to express my frustrations with the media, the naysayers, myself and ultimately with the voices in my head. One late night in my studio, after hearing the recent accusations against me and my character, I turned on my drum machine, found this amazing Willie Hutch sample, looped it, and went into the booth and let it all out. It felt great!”

In the four minute freestyle with no hook and no features, Cannon gives a mouthful as he speaks on the recent Eminem battle rap topic and actually having more in common with Eminem than people would think. He explains how he is able to relate to Eminem’s dysfunctional relationship with his child’s mother, specifically. He also vented about his father’s death, health issues, fan misconceptions, and the devastation he still experiences due to the separation from his children and worrying about their upbringing.

At the end of Nick’s freestyle he says that after two years he’s been the one waiting. We may never know the specifics of Nick and Mariah’s current situation but, just maybe, this freestyle was the closure that was necessary to speed up the process and finally make the divorce final.