Do you remember where you were when you first found out that Snoop Dogg was related to Brandy and Ray J? How weird it was when you found out that RZA, GZA and Ol’ Dirty Bastard were all from the same family tree? Well, that was how we felt when we first found out the Young Dolph was related to the fallen soldier, Juice WRLD. But what may blow you mind even further is connecting Juice with the squeaky-clean and positive, Chandler Kinney from Disney’s second installation of the ZOMBIE‘s franchise.

But right at the end of The Source‘s exclusive interview with the Disney starlet, she dropped the bomb on us.

When asked, “Who are you top rappers of all time?” Kinney revealed that along with Kendrick, Drake, Cardi B. and J. Cole, she had to add Juice WRLD first. “That’s family.”

Juice WRLD most certainly is one of the dopest voices of his generation and most certainly an interesting emcee cut down from his prime too soon. And so since blood is thicker than water and usually people who are related oftentimes share some inherited dopeness, we were not shocked when we found out Kinney was as amazing as she was… and that this role was perfect for her.

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Kinney had always wanted to be a Disney kid. As she looked up to personalities like Zendaya, this Californian triple-threat has found herself in the house that Mickey built. With a role that could make her a household name like the star she once got to guest star opposite on KC Undercover.

Kinney, who plays Willa Lykensen, is a beautiful, snazzy and leadership drenched werewolf. As a werewolf, she is an antagonist in the new offering of ZOMBIES 2. She also is Wyatt’s 15-year-old sister.

Willa is the Alpha werewolf and is considered the leader of the pack. Over and over she is called to demonstrate her strong leadership skills, while also hovering over her pack in the most protective way ever. Her loyalty and her understanding of her call have been what many who have seen the show have called a serious nature.

While she is serious and protective, Kinney shares that she loves this role.

So how exactly is this sequel different from the first ZOMBIES?

As the film starts, you get to see how it works when the zombies integrate with the humans around. And because oppressed people, once given a little bit our privilege and assimilates into the dominant culture, there is a sense of “we’ve made it.” That is where the werewolves come into play.

The werewolves according to Kinney now become the group that are the “different” ones that are feared and also responsible for “monster laws being reinstated.”

As a story of civil rights and equality, digested in a way that easy for younger people, Kinney says this is the message that is really being pushed, “We all are different, look different and speak but at the end of the day in the fundamental way more that brings us together than divide us.”

Kinney says that there are a few notions that fans should be on the lookout for when watching.

She believes that fans should really check out the dynamic between werewolves and zombies. Fans should also see how zombies can assimilate into the larger culture and how the werewolves cannot.

While staying away from stereotypes that people can easily glean from the movie after they watch ZOMBIES 2, Kinney asserts that “the werewolves may not represent a particular race in American culture but might also represent individuality.”

And individuality often can ostracize groups from the mainstream. In the first Zombies, fans can see how hard they had to work to be accepted and now the werewolves are in that same place.

This is a very Hip-Hop notion. So often generations of Hip-Hop frown on the next, putting the same scrutiny on the newer generation as it had been given to them. They look down on the new rap music versus giving them the compassionate listen that they had wished others would have done for them when they were younger bopping to their LL Cool J and Public Enemy.

This is another nod back to her cousin and why this film could be an homage to his legacy. If there was anything that Juice represented it was unapologetic individuality, done with a nice dose of digestible intellect.

Lil’ cuzzo you made him proud.