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Jarrell “Big Baby” Miller has failed a drug test that canceled his July 9 fight against Jerry Forrest.

Miller (23-0-1, 20 KOs) made his first public comments about the failure, pushing back against the allegations.

“I have never, ever willingly taken a steroid for performance-enhancing purposes,” Miller told Fight Network. “Did I take something for healing properties, for injuries? Yes, I have. But to win a fight and during a training camp? No, I have never done that.

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“Nobody can be more outraged than me,” he said of the allegations. “I’m the one that’s lost millions of dollars. I’m the one that’s had his career on the line. … But I have to think about it with a straight mind. I have to figure it out. Sit down with my team. Get everything in order and get everything done in the right way.”

Miller stressed that his team is going through a legal process to show the facts surrounding this situation.

He believes he listed the contaminated substance on a form that is submitted to the Voluntary Anti-Doping Association (VADA) as part of the testing process.

But Do We Believe You?

This is just the most recent drug test failure in a growing line of infractions for Miller.

Last year, Miller lost the biggest opportunity of his life.

He was scheduled to face unified heavyweight titleholder Anthony Joshua at Madison Square Garden in New York. However, he lost that opportunity as he tested positive for the banned substance GW1516 with a urine test conducted by the VADA in March 2019.

Further tests revealed HGH and IPO totaling three drug tests prior to his scheduled bout with Joshua.

At that time, Miller’s request for a boxing license was denied by the New York State Athletic Commission. He was then given a six-month suspension by the WBA.

Miller hasn’t had a bout since.

The last time Miller performed in the ring was in November 2018, when he stopped Bogdan Dinu in four rounds.

Miller was also suspended for nine months in 2014 for methylhexaneamine, during his days as a kickboxer.

In January, Miller agreed to a co-promotional deal to fight under the Top Rank banner, and the July 9 fight was to be his debut for the promotion.

Banned For Life?

Miller apologized to those who had given him another chance during a time when the world is watching the heavyweight ranks.

“I’ve done my research and homework to do my best to not make this happen, and all I can do is apologize to Bob Arum, apologize to J. Prince,” he said.

“But at the same time, I did do my homework. I did put my best foot forward. I did let VADA know of certain circumstances. I did my part as a human being and as a fighter …”

While the details are sorted out and Miller is now temporarily suspended by the Nevada State Athletic Commission, some have called for the permanent revocation of Miller’s boxing license.

Miller believes a permanent suspension would be excessive in this case.

“I should not be banned [for life],” he said. “I’m prepared to accept my suspension and be willing to do my monthly testing [during] my suspension, but to be banned for life? You’re out of your mind.

“It’s sad. I’m angry about it, but like I said, there is an explanation for it, and me and my legal team are working on it.”