Before ceasing operation in 2012, the 30-year-old Loud Records cemented a Hip Hop legacy housing a wide variety of the genre’s most influential acts in history, including Big Pun, Wu-Tang Clan, Lil Flip, Twista, M.O.P. and Mobb Deep. Now, Loud Music Group, accomplished executive Stanley “Citi” Atwater revives the Los Angeles-based infrastructure for the next generation and re-introduce the Steve Rifikin creation to the new frontier known as “the streaming era.”


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“I believe that the digital era mirrors the 90s era of hip-hop where you have all these emerging acts that are self-sufficient and independent,” Atwater said about the label returns . “Like Wu Tang, they were their own self-contained entity. Now you have groups like the Suicide Boys who have their own entity. So it’s a bigger opportunity than ever to give these acts their own platform to be able to put their music out independently and build a fanbase brick by brick through digital means.”

Launched in 1991 by Steve Rifkin, the legend behind signing musical icons Akon and David Banner, and reacquired from Universal as a subsidiary under SRC in 2007. Atwater convincing the industry veteran on reviving his relic property was simple, he advised Rifkin of the highly lucrative success that comes with most revamps of former titans in the modern-day pop culture thanks to social media. 

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“With platforms like Tik Tok, YouTube and Soundcloud it gives the fan the ability to discover and download which provides more of a grass roots approach for them to gain a cult like following and receive updates from their favorite artists instantly.”

And with Rifkin’s approval. First order of business, Atwater is set on storming the charts with a well-built, groomed and game changing roster of bonafide stars. The right man for the job, the Atlanta native’s resume includes the spearheading success of early Yung Joc, Boyz N Hood, Gorilla Zoe during Atlanta’s second wave, post-Crunk era run, in the mid-2000s. Inspired by Loud’s classic material, Atwater sets his sights on recreating that same magic like the label’s 1995 hit “Shook Ones” by Mobb Deep today.
Atwater remembers:

“Mobb Deep, the first time I heard ‘Shook Ones’… The first time I heard the line, “Aint no such thing as halfway crooks” That sounds, the sonics and lyrics from Prodigy and Havoc was so infectious it literally in sighted a riot inside my musical palate.”

Lastly, alongside adding a new chapter to the history, Atwater and team announce that all artists/clients will own their maters in order to change the way artists view record deals. Building a solid imprint that allows for artists to have more control over their destinies. Among the current roster, Atwater believes LMG have a game-changing project on their hands similar to his favorite Loud Records album of all-time, Enter the 36 Chambers.
Enter The 36 Chambers by Wutang Clan. It’s the greatest collective hip hop album every. Everyone was really a solo act but came together to be one. Today you’ve got artists like J-Cole looking to recreate the same thing with Earth Gang.”