Kelly Osbourne, the 39-year-old daughter of iconic rocker Ozzy Osbourne, has stirred controversy with her recent comments praising the weight-loss drug Ozempic as a preferable alternative to traditional gym workouts.


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In an exclusive interview with E! News at Dolly Parton’s Pet Gala red carpet, the aspiring singer shared her support for individuals who opt to use Ozempic, a medication primarily prescribed for diabetes management, as a means of shedding excess weight.

“I think it’s amazing,” Kelly expressed to E! News. “There are a million ways to lose weight, why not do it through something that isn’t as boring as working out?”

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However, Kelly’s endorsement of Ozempic was not without criticism of its detractors. She suggested that those who speak negatively about the drug may secretly desire its benefits or feel frustrated by its high cost, which can exceed $1,000 per month.

“People hate on it because they want to do it. And the people who hate on it the most are the people who are secretly doing it or pissed off that they can’t afford it,” Kelly asserted.

Despite acknowledging the drug’s expense, Kelly emphasized her belief that Ozempic’s effectiveness justifies its cost. She anticipates that as its popularity grows, its price may become more accessible to a broader demographic.

“Unfortunately, right now it’s something that is very expensive but it eventually won’t be because it actually works,” Kelly remarked.

Kelly’s advocacy for Ozempic comes in the wake of her own struggles with weight loss and body image. Following the birth of her son Sidney in 2022, Kelly admitted to feeling pressure to shed the postpartum weight, describing it as an obsession.

“I’m going to be honest, I felt the pressure of after having the baby to lose the baby weight,” Kelly revealed to E! News last fall. “It became my mission. I was obsessed with it because I didn’t even want to get brought into the conversation, I just wanted to be left alone.”

Kelly disclosed that her experience with Ozempic resulted in significant weight loss, with her reportedly dropping 100 pounds. While she acknowledges the drug’s role in her weight loss journey, her endorsement has sparked debate about the broader implications of using pharmaceutical interventions for cosmetic purposes.

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