In a recent development at the chaotic YSL RICO trial, Brian Steel, attorney for rapper Young Thug, will avoid spending Father’s Day in lockup after being found in contempt of court. ICYMI, that went down this week and set the legal world on fire. 


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On Wednesday, the Georgia Supreme Court granted Steel’s emergency motion to stay Judge Ural Glanville’s contempt order and agreed to hear his case in the future. Until the appeal is resolved, Steel will remain out of custody.

Again, ICYMI, the contempt charge stemmed from an incident on Monday when Steel approached the bench after the lunch recess, revealing he knew about an ex parte conversation involving the judge, prosecutors, and witness Kenneth “Lil Woody” Copeland. Copeland had reportedly confessed to killing Donovan “Nut” Thomas Jr.

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“If that’s true what this is is coercion, witness intimidation, ex parte communications that we have a constitutional right to be present for,” Steel argued. Judge Glanville demanded Steel disclose his source of information, but Steel refused. The judge gave Steel five minutes to reconsider, then left the courtroom. Upon returning, and with Steel still refusing, Glanville declared him in contempt and ordered him into custody.

Judge Glanville’s ruling mandated Steel serve 20 days in Fulton County Jail over 10 weekends, beginning this Friday. Steel requested to serve his time in Cobb County Jail with Young Thug but was denied. He then filed an appeal and a motion asking Glanville to “reconsider and rescind the order of contempt” or grant him bond pending the appeal.

Steel’s motion contended that the judge and prosecutors met with a sworn witness who had been granted immunity and had asserted his Fifth Amendment privilege. Steel argued that the information he disclosed in court was not confidential by any court order, and Glanville’s punishment for contempt was “illegal and inherently inconsistent.”

As for the weekend jail sentence, the appeals court transferred Steel’s request to the Georgia Supreme Court, deeming it the “ultimate responsibility” for determining jurisdiction. A date for the appeal hearing has not yet been set.